Calico Lobster Landed At Captain Joe and Sons 6/1/12 One In 30 Million? Really?

A couple of weeks ago the New England Aquarium took possession of a calico lobster and was touting it through their marketing efforts as a one in 30 million lobster.

image

Either the numbers they are using are off or we here at the dock are the luckiest lobster dealers on the planet and should be stocking up on megabucks tickets because we get 2-5 a year.

Click here for pictures of the Calico Lobster at The New England Aquarium

I’m pegging the over/under on number of speckled lobsters that are landed at our dock this year at 3.

Here’s the first one I’ve seen this year landed June 1st by our Fisherman Mark Davis aboard the Holy Mackerel-

DSC06600

DSC06603

DSC06617

DSC06618

Just another mutant to add to the gallery of blue, marbled, albino, speckled, yellow, double clawed, triple clawed and other odd lobsters landed here at our dock, Captain Joe and Sons.

Click below to see the pictures I’ve taken over the years of mutant lobsters landed at our dock.

image

Sunset From The Dock 2/17/12

After reporting to duty down here since I was 9 years old and after school and summers in High School and every day since graduating from Bentley I sometimes take the view for granted.  But then every once in a while when it’s slow I stop for a second and get bowled over by how lucky I am to have this view from our dock.

DSC02900

That German U-Boat That Torpedoed Our Grandfathers Fishing Boat The Ben and Josephine? Here’s The Account of It’s Day Of Reckoning

Here’s the account of the sinking of our Grandfather Captain Joe Ciaramitaro’s Ben and Josephine-

http://www.wholesalelobster.com/

David Teele forwards the link to the account of the last days of the German U-boat the 432 on the 11th of March 1943-

REPORT ON INTERROGATION OF SURVIVORS FROM "U 432," A 500-TON

U-BOAT SUNK AT ABOUT 1200 G.M.T. ON 11th MARCH, 1943

        "U 432" (Kapitänleutnant Hermann Eckhardt) was sunk in approximate position 51° 35′ N., 28° 30′ W. at about 1300 G.M.T. on 11th March, 1943, by F.F.S. "Aconit" escorting Convoy H.X.228.  "Aconit" had 12 hours previously assisted in the sinking of "U 444" (see C.B. 04051 (63) ), from which boat she had also taken prisoners.

        At about 1100 the same day, "U 432" had torpedoed and sank H.M.S. "Harvester," who had on board one prisoner from "U 444."  Survivors from H.M.S. "Harvester," "U 444" and "U 432" were then transported to Greenock by "Aconit," together with survivors from two ships of H.X.228, torpedoed in the night of 10/11th March, 1943.

III. EIGTH AND LAST PATROL OF "U 432"

(All times are German Summer Time.)

(i)  Departure from La Pallice

        At 1730 on 14th February, 1943, "U 432" cast off from her berth on the north side of the basin at La Pallice.

        At 1750 she left the lock at the entrance to the basin.  There were scenes of great enthusiasm as all present waved "goodbye."  She rammed a harbour launch just after negotiating the lock.  On passing the boom "U 432" was escorted by a "Sperrbrecher" and two patrol vessels.  Also sailing with her was another U-Boat with a crocodile badge on her conning-tower.  Survivors could not remember her captain’s name.  At 2320 the escort parted company and "U 432" proceeded on her patrol alone and on the surface.  Her course was 270°.

(ii)  Passage southwards

        "U 432" remained on the surface until shortly before 0700 on 15th February, 1943, when she dived for the first time on this patrol.  She did not surface again until 1930 when it was found to be much rougher.  Many of her ship’s company were sick.  At 0800 on 16th February, she submerged again, surfacing once more just before dusk.  At 0900 on 17th February, she dived, re-surfacing the same night.  The whole of 18th February was also spent submerged.  Survivors thought that by then they were out of the Bay of Biscay.

(iii)  Receipt of Orders

        About 0100 on 19th February, Eckhardt received a signal ordering him to proceed to join a patrol line named "Wildfang" in a position which he decyphered as a point in the neighbourhood of the Canary Islands.  From this point onwards, "U 432" did not submerge again for some time.

        At 1545 on 20th February hands went to action stations for exercise and that evening there was a party to celebrate the end of the first week at sea.  There had been no events worthy of note since she left port.

(iv)  "U 432"  Alters Course

        By the evening of 21st February, the First Lieutenant began to wonder why they had proceeded so far southwards.  It was then that Eckhardt, seated in his cabin looking through his signal books realised that he had failed to insert a correction, issued prior to his sailing.  Consequently, the signal received on 19th February giving him his orders, had been wrongly decyphered and he had steered south instead of west since that date.  In its correct form the signal ordered him to a position off Newfoundland.  He immediately gave orders to alter course to 300°and made for the patrol line indicated in the original signal.

For the rest of the account which is very interesting click here to read it in entirety on http://www.uboatarchive.net-

http://www.uboatarchive.net/U-432INT.htm

Molly Ferrill Video- Lobstering Aboard The Arethusa

Molly writes-

Hey!

It’s manual focus, shutter speed 1/13, aperture 4.5, manual iso (400) and there are 335 frames included! I think I had the interval between shots at 5 seconds. Each image is a full-size jpeg, (which I don’t think was actually necessary, especially not for the web!) and I used final cut express software to edit the time lapse. (each frame is .03 seconds long I think). It was one of the first time lapses I have made with the intervalometer but I think it worked out pretty well… next time I will set the interval for a little shorter and take more frames so the final time lapse is a little longer! Oh and by the way, at the end I made the last few shots with longer and longer shutter speeds so that it would gradually fade to white. It wouldn’t have been that drastic at the very end if I hadn’t done that.

LOVE the one you did with the clouds! Gorgeous. It looks just like a time lapse but less jerky which is good for clouds. Very nice!

Here’s a link to a short little video I just made compiling some of the photos and short video clips from going out on the boat.

Lobster Fishing with Tom and Cody!

Captain Joe and Sons Forktruck Study In Black and White

click the photo for the slide show

image

Some may scratch their heads and wonder why anyone would want to take pictures of a greasy, rusty old forktruck.  Others may find some beauty in the images.

All in the eye of the beholder.

It was fun messing around focusing on different parts of the machine and using the light streaming through the front door of the dock to create shadows and highlight what I wanted highlighted.

How Do You Move A Thousand Pound Scallop Dredge? Very Carefully

Pete Mondello sold his old scallop dredge which he long ago sold his permits for to some guys from New Bedford.  This meant we needed to get it out of the yard and up over the rail of a pick up truck into it’s bed safely without it coming crashing down and  smashing the sides of the truck to bits.

We did it without incident.  Video at the bottom.

DSC00887DSC00891DSC00893DSC00897

Here’s an awesome video of a scallop dredge deployed over the side of a boat and working in the ocean from

22,819,054 lbs of Fish Landed In 120 Trips- Our Grandfather Captain Joe Featured In Atlantic Fisherman Magazine 1952

Courtesy Fred Buck at The Cape Ann Museum

To compare this and put some perspective to this accomplishment you can compare that 22,819,054 he landed to the total number of all groundfish landings in one year by all boats in Gloucester in 2010 were 81,400,00lbs.  His average trip over those 120 landings was 190,158.78 lbs.  This was landings of groundfish, not herring or pogies or mackerel.

amazing

From NOAA’s Records-

*Total landings of all species on groundfish trips were about 81.4 million pounds in 2010. This compares to landings ranging from 102.4 million pounds to 107.2 million pounds in the 2007-2009 fishing years. Groundfish landings on groundfish trips also declined from a high of 71.6 million pounds in 2008 to a low of 58.0 million pounds in 2010[11]. Non-groundfish landings on groundfish trips also declined from a high of 39.3 million pounds in 2007 to 23.3 million pounds in 2010 (Table 3).

image

image

image

Welcome The Latest Lobster Boat To The Gloucester Fleet- Pete Libro’s Cabaret V

DSC00653

The Cabaret V Is a Beast.   47 feet long and beamy as a bastard.   Big and roomy with plenty of deck space to shift gear and lobster like a lobster boat should- with the ability to move large numbers of lobster traps to areas where the lobster will be next.

On a small boat you are limited with the amount of gear you can shift and the weather you can fish.  On the Cabaret V Pete and his dedicated crew can fish rough weather comfortably and chase the lobsters by moving large amounts of lobster traps in front of the lobster moves to the deeper water and off shore.

Congrats Pete.

Video- Blue Lobster Landed In Gloucester By Lobster Boat The Connemara Bay

Kevin O’Maley and his crew swung by the dock with a Blue Lobster that they caught just off the Breakwater when lobstering today. Being the stand-up men they are, they will be bringing it to The Gloucester Maritime Heritage Center so that the community can enjoy checking it out.

Kevin and the boys also charter their boat for full or half day fishing trips. You can find them online at www.cbcharters.com

Go to the Gloucester Maritime Heritage Center to check it out. info here-

http://www.gloucestermaritimecenter.org/who_future.html

Thank You Kevin and crew for bringing the lobster to us to share with our readers.